humansofnewyork:

"A girl at work asked me if ‘cutting the rug’ was the same as ‘carpet munching.’"

humansofnewyork:

"A girl at work asked me if ‘cutting the rug’ was the same as ‘carpet munching.’"

jessgledhill0x:

erm yes please

jessgledhill0x:

erm yes please

(Source: kowabunguh)

indigoemma:

classic

indigoemma:

classic

rhydonmyhardon:

that is the face of satisfaction no man can guarantee

rhydonmyhardon:

that is the face of satisfaction no man can guarantee

(Source: emmie-rae)

red3blog:

somethingsomethingporn:

seananmcguire:

vaspider:

red3blog:

(snip)

Yep! On my bad days, I count steps. Stairs can have me crying in the stairwell, and unable to walk for sometimes literally DAYS afterwards without crippling agony. My joints hurt, my tendons burn… I can walk. I can walk short distances. I get given funny looks by people when I use my placard on “good” days, because on those days I LOOK able-bodied but I’m counting steps until I can’t walk anymore. Shutting down the escalators but leaving elevators a longer distance away is just as disabling to someone like me as taking away both options. I count steps. Every. Fucking. Day.

I stood for too long yesterday.  I was finishing recording a new album, and I don’t sing as well when I sit.  I made a choice.  For me, standing still is a killer; it’s worse, even, than walking.  So every second of standing was basically five steps.
I made a choice.
Today, I cannot stand unsupported.  I have stayed in my chair and refused liquids because the idea of walking to the bathroom makes me want to weep.  I can’t take painkillers strong enough to kill the pain and still write.
I made a choice.
Not all the days like this one are the result of choice.  Being forced to climb stairs by assholes who think they’re encouraging me to be more physically fit?  Not a choice.
So very often, it isn’t, for any of us.

On a mildly unrelated note, my boss was a keynote speaker at this meeting. She’s an expert in genetic causes of severe childhood obesity. She is herself obese. She dedicates her life to helping obese kids and their families - she’s discovered or been instrumental in discovering several genetic mutations that affect appetite control and how the brain responds to satiety signals, hunger, etc. She’s diagnosed hundreds of children and their families with these mutations and helped to prove that obesity is not simply a case of “fat people won’t stop eating/don’t exercise enough/whatever shit you’ve heard.” 
Please do not assume this meeting was all about “fat haters” getting together to hate on fat people. These are dedicated scientists and geneticists trying to figure out how the how the human brain and body works and looking for ways to help kids and adults who are being pushed to the brink of suicide because society keeps telling them they’re lazy, useless sugar-munching losers. 

Oh, okay. So they are one of the ones who only fat shames with totally good intentions so I guess that’s okay since fat people didn’t deserve respect in the first place.
Yeah, I get that these are “dedicated scientists”. The super-serious experts who supposedly demand complete respect. And yet, these sober-minded wonks still engaged in the petty, childish stunt you see above. Cribbed, I’m quite sure, from some fat shaming meme someone saw on their Facebook. But, right. I’m supposed to respect them when they insult and disrespect me. They are trying to save me from “suicide” by a society that hates me by telling me that society was right and that I shouldn’t exist. No, yeah, I totally see the difference there.
Fuck your boss and the rest of the eliminationist bigots and their immature pranks meant to demean and shame fat people being propped up as serious science. Your boss and the whole lot of them should be ashamed of themselves.

red3blog:

somethingsomethingporn:

seananmcguire:

vaspider:

red3blog:

(snip)

Yep! On my bad days, I count steps. Stairs can have me crying in the stairwell, and unable to walk for sometimes literally DAYS afterwards without crippling agony. My joints hurt, my tendons burn…

I can walk. I can walk short distances. I get given funny looks by people when I use my placard on “good” days, because on those days I LOOK able-bodied but I’m counting steps until I can’t walk anymore.

Shutting down the escalators but leaving elevators a longer distance away is just as disabling to someone like me as taking away both options.

I count steps. Every. Fucking. Day.

I stood for too long yesterday.  I was finishing recording a new album, and I don’t sing as well when I sit.  I made a choice.  For me, standing still is a killer; it’s worse, even, than walking.  So every second of standing was basically five steps.

I made a choice.

Today, I cannot stand unsupported.  I have stayed in my chair and refused liquids because the idea of walking to the bathroom makes me want to weep.  I can’t take painkillers strong enough to kill the pain and still write.

I made a choice.

Not all the days like this one are the result of choice.  Being forced to climb stairs by assholes who think they’re encouraging me to be more physically fit?  Not a choice.

So very often, it isn’t, for any of us.

On a mildly unrelated note, my boss was a keynote speaker at this meeting. She’s an expert in genetic causes of severe childhood obesity. She is herself obese. She dedicates her life to helping obese kids and their families - she’s discovered or been instrumental in discovering several genetic mutations that affect appetite control and how the brain responds to satiety signals, hunger, etc. She’s diagnosed hundreds of children and their families with these mutations and helped to prove that obesity is not simply a case of “fat people won’t stop eating/don’t exercise enough/whatever shit you’ve heard.” 

Please do not assume this meeting was all about “fat haters” getting together to hate on fat people. These are dedicated scientists and geneticists trying to figure out how the how the human brain and body works and looking for ways to help kids and adults who are being pushed to the brink of suicide because society keeps telling them they’re lazy, useless sugar-munching losers. 

Oh, okay. So they are one of the ones who only fat shames with totally good intentions so I guess that’s okay since fat people didn’t deserve respect in the first place.

Yeah, I get that these are “dedicated scientists”. The super-serious experts who supposedly demand complete respect. And yet, these sober-minded wonks still engaged in the petty, childish stunt you see above. Cribbed, I’m quite sure, from some fat shaming meme someone saw on their Facebook. But, right. I’m supposed to respect them when they insult and disrespect me. They are trying to save me from “suicide” by a society that hates me by telling me that society was right and that I shouldn’t exist. No, yeah, I totally see the difference there.

Fuck your boss and the rest of the eliminationist bigots and their immature pranks meant to demean and shame fat people being propped up as serious science. Your boss and the whole lot of them should be ashamed of themselves.

cafeconlecheytequila:

charliehadalittlewolf:

tuhhveit:

elsiesmarina:

themightyquinn666:

sorry everyone

Excuse me.
One of the first women to start her own independent production company.
Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles.
Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to.
Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image.
Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting.
Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando.
Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself.
Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s. 
One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse.
One of the first people to openly support gay rights.
Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation.
Donated her time and money to these charities.
Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there.
Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century
Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans.
Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model? 

marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there

and let’s not forget this

Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again.
"She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it." - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

EDUCATE YOURSELVES ON WHAT THIS WOMAN DID BEFORE YOU DARE SAY SHE WASN’T A ROLE MODEL!

cafeconlecheytequila:

charliehadalittlewolf:

tuhhveit:

elsiesmarina:

themightyquinn666:

sorry everyone

Excuse me.

  • One of the first women to start her own independent production company.
  • Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles.
  • Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to.
  • Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image.
  • Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting.
  • Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando.
  • Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself.
  • Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s. 
  • One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse.
  • One of the first people to openly support gay rights.
  • Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation.
  • Donated her time and money to these charities.
  • Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there.
  • Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century
  • Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans.

Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model? 

marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there

and let’s not forget this

Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again.

"She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it." - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

EDUCATE YOURSELVES ON WHAT THIS WOMAN DID BEFORE YOU DARE SAY SHE WASN’T A ROLE MODEL!

sparklysushi:

afunnyfeminist:

awwww-cute:

Meet Simba. He’s a Leonberger

I love these dogs. I saw a family of them walking down the street and just fell in wub.

lap dog. totally.

sparklysushi:

afunnyfeminist:

awwww-cute:

Meet Simba. He’s a Leonberger

I love these dogs. I saw a family of them walking down the street and just fell in wub.

lap dog. totally.

GPOY once I turn in my thesis

GPOY once I turn in my thesis

(Source: cute-overload)

yeahthatswhatshesaidnyc:

Yeah, That’s What She Said presents: The Flow
Gaze for Days: Screening & Panel7:45 p.m. March 30Specials on C at 195 Ave. C in New York CityGoFundMe // Facebook event
Where did the idea for The Flow come from?The Flow was born our of various conversations between the creators (Linda Dianne, Delly P, Nicole Ryan, & Kelly Lyn) about things that were not being discussed enough in the media. We felt there needed to be a place for four 20-something women to construct a conversation to praise or challenge those topics as a means to bring positive social change. Likewise, we needed to address the idea that certain topics couldn’t be discussed “in public” so we decided to be unabashedly upfront and honest no matter the topic.

What advice would you give to other women navigating the male-dominated world of film?
As four women who are navigating different areas of the male-dominated world of film and television, we are well aware of the struggle young women face when entering the field. One of the biggest things we can tell others attempting to join in is make a ruckus. If you’re passionate about directing, direct. If the hairs on the back of your neck stand when you edit, then spend every free moment doing it! If you keep making enough noise, they won’t be able to stop you from entering the door!

What can we expect from season 2 of The Flow?We just finished filming Season 2 this Sunday and I have to say that we have elevated our game! We have five new episodes and confessionals this time around and we’re ready to share our thoughts on orgasms, careers and beyond. We hope everyone has as much fun watching as we did filming.

To learn more & to see behind the scenes footage, check out The Flow on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram & Youtube.

This is a thing I’m doing!Check it out if you’re in NYC or check us out on our social media :D

yeahthatswhatshesaidnyc:

Yeah, That’s What She Said presents: The Flow

Gaze for Days: Screening & Panel
7:45 p.m. March 30
Specials on C at 195 Ave. C in New York City
GoFundMe // Facebook event

Where did the idea for The Flow come from?
The Flow was born our of various conversations between the creators (Linda Dianne, Delly P, Nicole Ryan, & Kelly Lyn) about things that were not being discussed enough in the media. We felt there needed to be a place for four 20-something women to construct a conversation to praise or challenge those topics as a means to bring positive social change. Likewise, we needed to address the idea that certain topics couldn’t be discussed “in public” so we decided to be unabashedly upfront and honest no matter the topic.
What advice would you give to other women navigating the male-dominated world of film?
As four women who are navigating different areas of the male-dominated world of film and television, we are well aware of the struggle young women face when entering the field. One of the biggest things we can tell others attempting to join in is make a ruckus. If you’re passionate about directing, direct. If the hairs on the back of your neck stand when you edit, then spend every free moment doing it! If you keep making enough noise, they won’t be able to stop you from entering the door!
What can we expect from season 2 of The Flow?
We just finished filming Season 2 this Sunday and I have to say that we have elevated our game! We have five new episodes and confessionals this time around and we’re ready to share our thoughts on orgasms, careers and beyond. We hope everyone has as much fun watching as we did filming.
To learn more & to see behind the scenes footage, check out The Flow on Twitter, Facebook, InstagramYoutube.

This is a thing I’m doing!
Check it out if you’re in NYC or check us out on our social media :D